Robotic Atrial Fibrillation San Antonio, TX

Millions of Americans have  heart rhythm disorder. During atrial fibrillation, at times, the top chambers of the heart do not properly beat. The results could include blood clots, heart attack, and stroke. Many people suffer from strokes since blood will pool in the atria of the heart, turn into a clot and then eventually be pumped out where it could travel to the brain.

Standard Atrial Fibrillation Surgery

Without more modern technology, the only way the surgery could be done (and is often done still) would be open heart. This means the chest is opened, the breast bone is cut and the rubs are spread. The heart is then operated on with a radiofrequency device and a pacemaker will most likely be implanted. This is major surgery that includes pain, long recovery times, and numerous different complications.

What is Robotic Atrial Fibrillation?

With this minimally invasive procedure, only a few small incisions are made on the side of the patient’s ribs. The chest will not be opened and the ribs will not need to be spread. Through the small incisions, the surgeon will use the da Vinci robot to access the heart and perform surgery. By performing this procedure using the robot, the patient has:

  • significantly lower recovery times
  • less time spent in the hospital and in intensive care
  • less loss of blood
  • less chance of infection
  • a lower chance of major complications

Additionally patients who have atrial fibrillation surgery with the da Vinci robot, indicate that they are able to go about their regular activities much quicker than those who have open heart surgery.

.

 

 

 

Tags:

Heart Health Living Lecture

Category: Healthy Living

Red heart and a stethoscope on cardiagram

Interested in learning more about how to keep your heart healthy? Join Dr. Ford and other people in the San Antonio for Dr. Ford’s Heart Health Living Lecture.

When?

Wednesday, July 9 from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Where?

The fourth floor of Dr. Ford’s office building.

Heart Health Lectures San Antonio, TX

Please RSVP by calling 210-705-4855


Is Atrial Fibrillation Necessary? The Most Important Study Presented at the Heart Rhythm Society 2014 Scientific Sessions

Most diseases have a turning point, a time when things begin to change.

What follows is a report on what I believe may be (pardon the big word) an inflection point in the way we think about the most common heart-rhythm disorder.

Dr Rajeev Pathak, an electrophysiology fellow in the laboratory of Prof Prashanthan Sanders in Adelaide, Australia, gave the presentation. It happened late in the afternoon, in a small room, nestled into a back corner of the massive convention hall. Even though this paper won the prestigious Eric Prystowsky award for outstanding clinical science, there were no press releases, no simultaneous publications, and nearly no attendees in the small room. Session chair Dr Francis Marchlinski(University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia) remarked that it “was too bad more people weren’t here to hear this.”

Here’s my recap of the Aggressive Risk Factor Reduction Study-Implications for Ablation Outcomes (ARREST-AF) trial[1]:”

Read more about the most important study presented at the Heart Rhythm Society 2014 Scientific Sessions.

Is Atrial Fibrillation Necessary? The Most Important Study Presented at the Heart Rhythm Society 2014 Scientific Sessions 
theheart.org on Medscape, 2014-05-11

Tags:

Robotic Heart Bypass Surgery San Antonio, TX

Category: Heart Surgeon

Minimally invasive heart bypass surgery has many benefits over traditional surgery.

What is a Minimally Invasive Heart Bypass Surgery?

A minimally invasive heart bypass surgery includes the following steps:

  • Making a three to five inch long cut in the left part of your chest in between your ribs, which gives the surgeon the ability to reach the heart.
  • The costal cartilage, a small part of the front of the rib, is removed.
  • The surgeon finds and prepares an artery on your chest wall to attach to the blocked coronary artery.
  • In the final step, the surgeon will connect the prepared chest artery to the coronary artery.

Benefits of Minimally Invasive Surgery

Minimally invasive surgery boasts many benefits over conventional bypass surgery, such as:

  • Shorter length of stay – Most patients are discharged from the hospital within two to three days as opposed to five to 10.
  • Available to more patients
  • Lower infection rate – There is less exposure during a minimally invasive surgery, lowering the chance of infection.
  • Faster recovery – Patients can typically return to activities two weeks after surgery compared to an eight week recovery period.
  • Less bleeding and less trauma – Not having to be put on a heart-lung machine reduces the risk of blood clots and lowers the chance of blood cells being damaged.

Dr. Renata Bastos Ford, MD

Dr. Renata Bastos Ford performs minimally invasive heart surgery in San Antonio, TX, including mitral valve replacement, aortic valve replacement and coronary revascularization. Schedule an appointment today by calling 210-519-5797.

 


Watch Dr. Ford on Channel 4 News!

Category: News

Dr. Renata Bastos Ford made an appearance on Channel 4 to review facts about heart disease and proper nutrition. Check out the video on News 4 San Antonio!


What You Should Know about Robotic Atrial Fibrillation Surgery

Minimally Invasive Heart Surgeon

Millions of Americans have atrial fibrillation, or heart rhythm disorder, and they may or may not even know about it. During atrial fibrillation, at times, the top chambers of the heart do not properly beat. The results could include blood clots, heart attack, and stroke. Many people suffer from strokes since blood will pool in the atria of the heart, turn into a clot and then eventually be pumped out where it could travel to the brain.

Patients who do have atrial fibrillation will need to go through some type of treatment in order to correct the problem. For some cases, medication or short therapies can be used. In many cases, the problem requires surgery.

Standard Atrial Fibrillation Surgery

Without more modern technology, the only way the surgery could be done (and is often done still) would be open heart. This means the chest is opened, the breast bone is cut and the rubs are spread. The heart is then operated on with a radiofrequency device and a pacemaker will most likely be implanted. This is major surgery that includes pain, long recovery times, and numerous different complications.

It is an extremely invasive surgery that can be very difficult on many patients.

Robotic Surgery Using the da Vinci Robot

With this minimally invasive procedure, only a few small incisions are made on the side of the patient’s ribs. The chest will not be opened and the ribs will not need to be spread. Through the small incisions, the surgeon will use the da Vinci robot to access the heart and perform surgery. By performing this procedure using the robot, the patient has:

  • significantly lower recovery times
  • less time spent in the hospital and in intensive care
  • less loss of blood
  • less chance of infection
  • a lower chance of major complications

Additionally patients who have atrial fibrillation surgery with the da Vinci robot, indicate that they are able to go about their regular activities much quicker than those who have open heart surgery.

What is the da Vinci Robot?

This high tech machine uses high definition visualization and very small instruments that can be used for surgery through even the smallest of incisions. The arms of the robot are controlled by the physician and it mimics the doctor’s hand movements precisely. This allows the surgeon to reach areas within the body without having to make large incisions and without seriously damaging skin and tissue.

Atrial fibrillation is a common condition that many people deal with on one level or another. If a patient’s condition warrants surgery, the minimally invasive surgery means much less blood loss, much less pain, much shorter recovery, and much lower risks of complications. With this type of high-tech surgery, patients will recover much more quickly and will not have to deal with negative side effects as well as high chances of infection.

 

 

 


20th Annual Cardiovascular Update

Category: Heart Surgeon

WEB Flyer CV 2013

Tags:

A Randomized Controlled Trial to Prevent Post-Operative Atrial Fibrillation by Antioxidant Reinforcement

Objectives This study was designed to assess whether the reinforcement of the antioxidant system, through n-3 fatty acids plus antioxidant vitamin supplementation, could reduce the incidence of post-operative atrial fibrillation.

Background Therapy to prevent post-operative atrial fibrillation remains suboptimal. Although oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathogenesis of this arrhythmia, antioxidant reinforcement has produced controversial results.

Methods A total of 203 patients scheduled for on-pump cardiac surgery were randomized to placebo or supplementation with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (2 g/day) (eicosapentaenoic acid:docosahexaenoic acid ratio 1:2), vitamin C (1 g/day), and vitamin E (400 IU/day). The primary outcome was the occurrence of post-operative atrial fibrillation. Secondary outcomes were the biomarkers related to oxidative stress and inflammation.

Results Post-operative atrial fibrillation occurred in 10 of 103 patients (9.7%) in the supplemented group versus 32 of 100 patients (32%) in the placebo group (p < 0.001). Early after surgery, placebo patients presented with increased levels of biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress, which were markedly attenuated by antioxidant supplementation. The activity of catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase in atrial tissue of the supplemented patients was 24.0%, 17.1%, and 19.7% higher than the respective placebo values (p < 0.05). The atrial tissue of patients who developed atrial fibrillation showed NADPH oxidase p47-phox subunit protein and mRNA expression 38.4% and 35.7% higher, respectively, than patients in sinus rhythm (p < 0.05).

Conclusions This safe, well-tolerated, and low-cost regimen, consisting of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids plus vitamins C and E supplementation, favorably affected post-operative atrial fibrillation, increased antioxidant potential, and attenuated oxidative stress and inflammation. (Prevention of Post-Operative Atrial Fibrillation: Pathophysiological Characterization of a Pharmacological Intervention Based on a Novel Model of Nonhypoxic Pre-Conditioning; ISRCTN45347268)

 

Find more information about A Randomized Controlled Trial to Prevent Post-Operative Atrial Fibrillation by Antioxidant Reinforcement.

Tags:

Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Surgery in Texas

Category: Heart Surgeon

Heart Surgery, CA

Aortic valve surgery is done to replace the aortic valve in your heart. If an aortic valve does not close all the way or it isn’t allowing for proper blood flow, minimally invasive aortic valve surgery may be necessary.

Why Might Someone Need An Aortic Valve Surgery?

Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery is performed for a variety of reasons, including:

  • Changes in the aortic valve are causing heart symptoms, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, fainting spells or heart failure.
  • Your heart valve has been damaged by endocarditis, or infection of the heart valve.
  • Changes in your aortic valve are beginning to harm how well your heart works.

 

What are the Benefits of Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement?

Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement offers many benefits over open aortic valve replacement such as:

  • Smaller, three to four inch incisions near the sternum
  • Less pain after the surgery
  • Shorter hospital stays
  • Quicker recovery time
  • Less bleeding
  • Less chance of infection

Are you a Candidate for Minimally Invasive Surgery?

Patients with aortic stenosis or aortic regurgitation are the best candidates for minimally invasive surgery. However, patients that require additional surgery for aortic aneurysms or coronary artery disease will not be considered for surgery.

For more information on minimally invasive aortic valve replacement, consult your physician.

 


Minimally Invasive Heart Bypass Surgery

Category: Heart Surgeon

Heart Surgeons

Minimally invasive heart bypass surgery has many benefits over traditional surgery.

What is a Minimally Invasive Heart Bypass Surgery?

A minimally invasive heart bypass surgery includes the following steps:

  • Making a three to five inch long cut in the left part of your chest in between your ribs, which gives the surgeon the ability to reach the heart.

  • Once the small surgical cut has been made, muscles will be pushed apart

  • The costal cartilage, a small part of the front of the rib, is removed.

  • The surgeon finds and prepares an artery on your chest wall to attach to the blocked coronary artery.

  • In the final step, the surgeon will connect the prepared chest artery to the coronary artery.

Why Would a Minimally Invasive Heart Bypass Be Performed?

A minimally invasive heart bypass may be a suggestion if you have one or two blocked coronary arteries. Though surgery is often a suggestion, before jumping to surgery, a doctor may have tried treatment with medicine, cardiac rehabilitation, an angioplasty or other treatments.

Benefits of Minimally Invasive Surgery

Minimally invasive surgery boasts many benefits over conventional bypass surgery, such as:

  • Shorter length of stay – Most patients are discharged from the hospital within two to three days as opposed to five to 10.

  • Faster recovery – Patients can typically return to activities two weeks after surgery compared to an eight week recovery period.

  • Less bleeding and less trauma – Not having to be put on a heart-lung machine reduces the risk of blood clots and lowers the chance of blood cells being damaged.

  • Lower infection rate – There is less exposure during a minimally invasive surgery, lowering the chance of infection.

  • Available to more patients

 

Consult your physician today for more information on minimally invasive heart bypass surgery.